Jihadism After the Caliphate: A Joint GWUPOE-FFI Discussion

Following the loss of most of its territorial control in Iraq and Syria, many leaders declared that the Islamic State was defeated. Yet, more than one year later, the group is still active in its core area, and increased its activities in other conflict-torn countries, such as Afghanistan and the Philippines. Meanwhile, al Qaeda shows signs of resurgence and is potentially poised to retake its role at the helm of the global jihadist movement. More broadly, jihadist ideology continues to inspire various groups and isolated individuals throughout the world.

To discuss these and related issues, the Program on Extremism at the George Washington University, in cooperation with the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI), and with the support of the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, hosted a panel discussion on the future of jihadism on January 25, 2019.

Following introductory remarks by Ambassador Kåre R. Aas, the Norwegian Ambassador to the United States, Program on Extremism Senior Research Fellow Haroro J. Ingram moderated a panel discussion on the future of the transnational jihadi movement. Panelists included:

  • Anne Stenersen, Senior Research Fellow at the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment and author of Al-Qaida in Afghanistan
  • Thomas Hegghammer, Senior Research Fellow at the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment and author of Jihad in Saudi Arabia: Violence and Pan-Islamism since 1979
  • Cole Bunzel, Fellow at the Program on Extremism and Research Fellow in Islamic Law and Civilization at Yale Law School